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Astro*Dictionary by Michael Erlewine

 

 

 

 

3 article for "Daylight Saving Time"

Daylight Saving Time   DST [Astro*Index]

A convenience in clock time accomplished by setting civil time ahead by one hour in order to extend daylight during summer months. Though it was instituted (in the United States) to begin at 02:00AM on the last Sunday in April and end at 01:00AM on the last Sunday in October, it has been observed erratically both by year and region since its inception, not always (in earlier years) even being consistent from one place to another during the same years. An adjustment for DST must be made in computing an astrological chart. It is equivalent to the standard time zone one hour east of the same location.

See also:
♦ Civil Time
Daylight Saving Time [Munkasey M.]

A shift in the clock time to one hour ahead tomove an early morning daylight hour to later in the day.

See also:
♦ Civil Time
Daylight Saving Time [DeVore]

This was originated in England in 1916, where it was called Summer Time. It consists of an arbitrary setting ahead of the clock by one hour, thereby shifting all the day's activities an hour earlier, ending the work day that much sooner and leaving an hour more of daylight in which to indulge in seasonal recreations. In general, it commences at 2 A. M. of the Sunday following the third Saturday in April, and ends on the Sunday after the first Saturday in October. This is not a reliable guide, for in its earlier years it sometimes began as early as March 24. Furthermore, during World War II England set the clock ahead by two hours, making Double Summer Time. During the same period, beginning Feb. 9, 1942 at 2 P. M., the United States had War Time, a year-round setting ahead of the clock by one hour. Prior to that, some parts of the United States observed Daylight Saving Time during certain periods in certain years, but other localities refused to accept or ratify it; and even in those where it was legally authorized, many refused to abide by it. Even though a record of the vagaries of time observance is attempted in a volume called World Daylight Saving Time, by Curran and Taylor, the only safe way to record an event is not only to state in what kind of time it was recorded, but in addition to give its equivalent in Greenwich Standard or Universal Time. In most other countries the problem is still more complicated. All of Mexico is -6h, except part of Lower California, which is -8h. Some adopt a time meridian that involves a half-hour adjustment, like Hawaii, which is GMT - 10h 30m. All of Russia adjusts to a time unit which is the virtual equivalent of permanent daylight saving. Bolivia is -4:33 and Venezuela -4:30. In addition, there is for some Middle European countries an adjustment of the date itself from the old-style to the new-style calendar, and the impossible determination whether time was given in apparent Sun time or Solar Mean time, or whether some arbitrarily selected meridian became the basis for the standard time of the country.

The important factors for the astrologer to establish are: (1) the exact equivalent of a given moment as expressed in Universal Time, in order therefrom to compute from the Ephemeris the exact position occupied by the planets at that precise moment; and (2) the exact equivalent of the same moment in Local Mean Time for the place where the event occurred, wherefrom with the aid of the sidereal time of noon or midnight on that date, and of Tables of Houses for the Latitude of the place, to calculate the Midheaven position, the Ascendant degree, and the intermediate cusps of the Figure. Universal Time is variously called World Time, Greenwich Civil Time, Greenwich Standard Time, or zero zone time.

An ephemeris calculated for other than zero meridian is a simplification that is of doubtful value, in that it introduces the possibility of confusion on the part of those who work by formulas rather than by a comprehension of the elements involved. In using an ephemeris calculated, let us say, for 75° W. Long., one bases his calculations on that time meridian, instead of the zero meridian, correcting zone time to local time by subtracting 4m for each degree of longitude W., or adding it for each degree of Long. E., of the 75th meridian.

See also:
♦ Civil Time

 

Astro*Index Copyright © 1997 Michael Erlewine